Nature Profiles

Liverworts of Ben Lawers NNR

 

Aneura pinguis

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A common liverwort of base-rich flushes and seeping rocks, Aneura pinguis is a fairly common sight on the Lawers range.
It can be distinguished from Riccardia species sometimes found in flushes by the calcareous habitat and sparsely-branched, wider thalli.

 

 

Anthelia julacea

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Anthelia julacea is a species of permanently wet, acidic habitats and is commonly seen on flushed rock slabs in areas where snow lies late in the year.

In these habitats on the Lawers range it is often associated with purple forms of Marsupella emarginata, Blindia acuta and orange Sphagnum denticulatum.
 

 

 

Anthelia juratzkana

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Although superficially similar to Anthelia julacea, A.juratzkana is fairly easy to recognise when encountered, given its smaller size.  Another very useful field character is that it is never found in the permanently wet habitats favoured by its relative.
A.juratzkana is a species of bare soil on mountain summit areas where it forms part of the late-snow liverwort crust community.  Frequent associates on the Lawers range are Marsupella condensata, Blindia acuta, Diplophyllum taxifolium and various lichen species.

 

 

Barbilophozia floerkii

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leaf, showing cilia at base
The most common Barbilophozia on the Lawers hills, B.floerkii is found on acidic schist boulders and outcrops, often with Polytrichum spp. and Racomitrium lanuginosum.  It also occurs in snowbed habitats, where it is often much smaller.

It is typically more orange in colour than B.lycopodioides, which also occurs in much more sheltered habitats.

 





 

Barbilophozia lycopodioides

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Bazzania tricrenata

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Diplophyllum albicans

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Diplophyllum taxifolium

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Frullania tamarisci

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lower W slope of Beinn Ghlas
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Gymnomitrion concinnatum

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Meall Corranaich


 
Much the commonest Gymnomitrion on the Lawers hills, this species is found on damp crags, where it forms small patches of greenish-white stems, superficially resembling mosses such as Anomobryum or Myurella.  Close inspection shows the appressed, two-lobed leaves to have acute apices.

 

 

Gymnomitrion obtusum

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Closely resembling G.concinnatum, this species tends to be found in drier, more exposed habitats, and in my experience, on more acidic rocks.
Unlike G.concinnatum, the leaf lobes have rounded, obtuse apices and in the field the plants often have a very pale of-white colour unlike typical concinnatum.
 

 

 

Herbertus stramineus

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An Stuc

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Meall Corranaich
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Jungermannia exsertifolia

 
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Lophozia opacifolia

 
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Lophozia sudetica



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Marsupella condensata

 
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Marsupella emarginata

 
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Mylia taylori

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Nardia scalaris

 
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Odontoschisma elongatum

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Preissia quadrata

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Ptilidium ciliare

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Scapania aequiloba

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Scapania cuspiduligera

 
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Scapania degenii

 
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Scapania subalpina

ssbelow Creag an Lochain
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Scapania undulata

 
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Tritomaria polita



 
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Tritomaria quinquedentata

 
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Riccardia

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Moerckia hibernica

 
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Barbilophozia floerkii

 
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Barbilophozia floerkii

 
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Barbilophozia floerkii

 
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Barbilophozia floerkii

 
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