Wildlife photos and info from around the world

Wildlife photos and info from around the world

Andrew HodgsonYes, I'm Andy (or Andrew to most people, but hey, that wouldn't make a catchy sounding website name would it?).  In my spare time I love nothing more than getting out and about and doing nature photography, partly to 'collect' memories of what I see, and also to celebrate the great beauty and diversity of the natural world with others.

View Nature Profiles, the key area on the website that's growing regularly with original photos and some scientific information on many species from around the world. I've got a real passion for reptiles, but Britain isn't the best spot in the world to satisfy that interest, so I've learnt to appreciate and photograph all sorts of other stuff.  Whatever the season, and whatever the place, there's always something interesting to be found.

Lizards of the Mount Lofty Ranges Lizards from the Adelaide Hills and Fleurieu Peninsula in South Australia, with a couple of extras! Reptiles of the Eyre Peninsula Photos from Lincoln National Park, on the south coast, and from my time helping out on a survey of mallee reptiles at Pinkawillinie Conservation Park, near Kimba. Lizards of the Flinders Ranges Lizards photographed at Mt Remarkable National Park, Wilpena Pound, and in Telowie Gorge CP. Lizards of Victoria Victoria has a very varied lizard fauna because of its diverse range of habitats. Each habitat zone has its own distinctive species, from mallee specialists in the north-west, to alpine-adapted lizards in the north-east of the state. Liverworts of Derbyshire England has a smaller number of bryophyte species than Scotland, but there is still plenty to keep a bryologist busy! Every habitat has a distinctive community of mosses associated with it, from woodlands, to arable fields, to acidic moorland. Mosses of Derbyshire part 1 Derbyshire's moss flora is diverse, with around 390 species recorded in the last 25 years - just over half the number of species in Britain as a whole. I'm very grateful to Tom Blockeel, who has given endless assistance with identifications and sites to visit. This section contains mosses from Sphagnum to Leucobryum. Bryophytes of the Lake District, Cumbria & Teesdale The Lake District is the one area of England where typically oceanic or northern montane mosses and liverworts can thrive. Bryophytes of other areas of Northern England This small section of the site contains images & descriptions of bryophytes from Staffordshire and Yorkshire. Bryophytes of Dorset Dorset's heathlands are a great place to find a wide range of mosses, many of them scarce in England. The rest of the county also has a good range of species, some of them extremely rare Mediterranean species not found elsewhere in Britain. Liverworts of Ben Lawers NNR Ben Lawers is a wonderful site for finding rare upland liverworts. Approximately 170 species are found on the Ben Lawers range, making it one of the most diverse areas for bryophytes in Britain. Mosses of Ben Lawers NNR part 1 The original Bryophytes section got too big, so the mosses of this incredible place now have a section all to themselves! Mosses of Ben Lawers NNR part 2 The great diversity of species here has necessitated a second section! Liverworts of other areas of Scotland The photos in this ever-expanding section are from various Scotland is home to a wider range of liverworts than any other area in the British Isles, and is internationally important for its 'hepatic mat assemblage' of robust oceanic liverworts. Mosses of other areas of Scotland part 1 The photos in this ever-expanding section are from various other travels in Scotland. Mosses of other areas of Scotland part 2 This section contains all the Hypnales photographed on my travels in Scotland. Mosses of Derbyshire part 2 The original single Derbyshire mosses page has expanded into three pages, and this second page illustrates and describes members of the Pottiaceae, Grimmiaceae, Seligeriales, Encalyptales, Funariales, and Bryales. Mosses of Derbyshire part 3 This final section contains Bryales, Orthotrichales and Hookeriales, plus all the Hypnales. Flora of East Anglia Although heavily modified by intensive agriculture, East Anglia still has protected sites rich in their original flora, from ancient broad-leaved woodlands to fens and wetlands. Birds of Prey Australia's raptor fauna is not especially diverse given its large size, with just 26 species. Nonetheless, birds of prey are conspicuous on many journeys through inland Australia, from the majestic Wedge-tailed Eagle, to the smaller, elegant harriers. Other Birds This section has my photos of all those birds that don't fit into the other sections! Birds of the Coast With such as extensive coastline, Australia has a diverse community of coastal birds from oceanic albatrosses, to the waders, herons and egrets of intertidal zones. Wattlebirds and Honeyeaters Honeyeaters and Wattlebirds are members of the family Meliphagidae, which is highly developed in Australia. These birds are nectar-feeders, and play a vital role in the pollination of many Australian shrubs and trees, especially in the families Proteaceae and Myrtaceae. 37 species from this family occur in South Australia - some scarce birds of the arid interior, and others widespread birds of eucalypt woodland. Parrots Every habitat in Australia has a characterstic set of parrots, from city parks to the arid Outback. Fifty-four parrot species are found in Australia, with thirty-four of these found in South Australia, although the distributions of some only just enter the extreme corners of the state. Marsupials Marsupials are the most famous mammals in Australia, and are the most diverse group of mammals across the continent. They range from the tiny Pygmy Possums to the largest of all, the Red Kangaroo, which can stand taller than a grown man. Monotremes Monotremes are egg-laying mammals. The most famous is the platypus, but the echidna is more frequently seen. Pinnipeds Pinnipeds are the seals and sea lions (and walruses in the Northern hemisphere). Butterflies of France coming soon Zygaenid Moths of France coming soon Grasshoppers & Beetles of France coming soon Cacti & Succulents of the Sonoran Desert The Sonoran Desert is synonymous with cacti, and a wide diversity of species can be seen here. Herbaceous Flora of the Sonoran Desert The Sonoran Desert occupies the central and south-western third of Arizona. It is lower in elevation than the Chihuahuan & Mojave deserts and hence has a milder climate, although snow can fall in extreme winters. Flora of the Dark Peak and Eastern Moors The Dark Peak is dominated by gritstone moorland and acidic river valleys and woodlands, and hence has a very different flora from the limestone dales of the White Peak. Flora of the Pyrenees coming soon! Flora of Derbyshire - the White Peak grasslands - part 1 coming soon Flora of Victoria coming soon Flora of other areas of South Australia coming soon Flora of the Flinders Ranges coming soon Flora of the South Australian Mallee coming soon Flora of Coffin Bay & Lincoln National Parks coming soon Flora of the Adelaide Hills & Mount Lofty Ranges - smaller plants coming soon Flora of the Cordillera Cantabrica coming soon Trees, Shrubs & Ferns of the Sonoran Desert coming soon Flora of the Adelaide Hills & Mount Lofty Ranges - Trees & Shrubs coming soon Moths of the Adelaide Hills coming soon Snakes of Victoria coming soon Snakes of South Australia coming soon Snakes of Spain Spain has an interesting snake fauna of 13 species, including several endemics. As is typical with snakes, even though they are widespread in Spain, they are not easily seen, and coming across one invariably involves being in the right place at the right time! Amphibians of Spain Despite its largely dry climate, Spain has a well-developed amphibian fauna of 9 newts & salamanders, and 19 frogs & toads, with a mixture of typical Mediterranean species in the south, and temperate European species further north. Lizards of Spain Twenty-eight species of lizards are currently recognised from Spain, with six endemic species and several others with the vast majority of their range in the country. Birds of Spain Over 500 species have been recorded from Spain, and the country makes a wonderful destination for an ornithologist. Many species which have experienced long-term declines elsewhere in Europe remain common and are easily seen in Spain. Flora of the Cordillera Cantabrica part 2 This overflow section contains all the photos of monocots and ferns, as well as several other plant families. Flora of the Galician coast The Galician coast is typified by long sandy shores and dune systems in the south, and rocky outcrops in the north. The flora of the southern coast is typical of Mediterranean Europe, with several species reaching their north-western limit here. Spanish Bryophytes coming soon! Snakes of Arizona Arizona can boast 54 species of snake - the most for any state in the US. It is most famous for the rattlesnakes, of which there are 13 species in Arizona. Less well known are the remaining 41 species of snake, many of which are small, harmless nocturnal desert dwellers which few people are lucky enough to ever see. Turtles & Tortoises of Arizona Arizona has several turtle and tortoise species. Lizards of Arizona Lizards are easily seen in just about any habitat in Arizona. There are over 50 species native to the state, from the common and conspicuous fence lizards to secretive and rarely seen mountain skinks, and of course, the world-famous Gila Monster. Butterflies of South Australia Butterflies in South Australia have very different habits to those here in Britain. South Australia has no flower meadows, and few plants flower in the summer because of the lack of rainfall. Because of this, many butterflies stay in the treetops to feed on eucalypt nectar. This is especially true for the Lycaenids, whose larvae feed on mistletoes, often in gum trees. There is a good variety of species in South Australia, especially in the wetter south of the state. Read more about a few of them in this section! Butterflies of Victoria Only one photo in here - I'll make another trip to get some more one day! Dragonflies of South Australia Being a dry state, dragonflies are much less varied and abundant in South Australia than the wetter eastern states. Even so, there are as about as many dragonfly species in South Australia as there are in Britain, so I didn't complain! Reptiles of Derbyshire Derbyshire is home to 4 of Britain's 6 reptile species, although seeing them is often down to good luck. None of the reptiles has a county-wide distribution, although they can be locally common. For example, the Grass Snake prefers the river valleys of eastern Derbyshire, while the Common Lizard is most easily seen in the limestone dales and heather moorland of the Peak District (although even there they are not necessarily a common sight!). Amphibians of Arizona Being primarily a desert state, Arizona is not overly well endowed with amphibian diversity. Despite this, as well as having a single native salamander, there are a host of specially adapted desert toads, and a number of canyon-dwelling frogs, some of which are threatened with extinction. Australian Frogs So far, only frogs from South Australia, but hopefully more will follow! Blues A meadow shimmering with little blue butterflies is one of the delights of summer in my opinion. Sadly, some of these species are in long-term decline, and their survival depends on dedicated conservation efforts to maintain their grassland habitats. There are 9 species of Lycaenids (Blues) in Britain, including 3 here in Derbyshire. Browns These species certainly live up to their name - all of them are various shades of brown, with the notable exception of the beautiful Marbled White. They are not altogether plain however, and often have patterns of orange spots or blotches. There are 11 species in Britain, 6 of which are found in Derbyshire. Unusually for British butterflies, two of this group are virtually restricted to Scotland. Whites The whites (Pieridae) comprise some of our most familar butterflies, including the ubiquitous 'Cabbage White', which is actually two similar species - the Small and Large White. This family also contains the delicate Wood White, one of our most threatened butterflies. Skippers, Hairstreaks & Coppers The Skippers are the most unusual of Britain's butterflies as far as appearance goes - they look more like moths than butterflies. There are 8 species in Britain, and 4 are found in Derbyshire. The Hairstreaks are elusive butterflies, named for the fine-lined markings on their underwings. There are 5 species in Britain, but only 2 can be seen here in Derbyshire. The Copper family is a diverse group in mainland Europe, but only one species is found in Britain - the Small Copper, which is widespread. The Large Copper was formerly present in East Anglia, but became extinct in the 19th Century. Subsequent reintroductions have been unsuccessful. Fritillaries The fritillaries are attractive orange butterflies with varying striped and spotted black patterned wings. Many have declined dramatically in the last 100 years and are very sensitive to habitat disturbance. This family includes some of Britain's most threatened butterfly species. Eight species are found in Britain, and only one - the widespread Dark Green Fritillary - can be seen in Derbyshire. Nymphalids & miscellaneous The Nymphalids are among the most spectacular of Britain's butterflies, and some of the most familiar summer butterflies come from this family. Moths of Derbyshire part 1 Derbyshire has a reasonably good diversity of moths, given the wide variety of habitats found across the county. The limestone dales of the Peak District hold populations of nationally rare species, such as the Chalk Carpet. Moths of Garston Wood Garston Wood is an RSPB reserve in the far north of Dorset, near the village of Sixpenny Handley. Moths of Scotland Most of these moths were photographed at my parents' house, where I try and do some moth trapping when I visit. It's far enough north to get a good selection of species different to those I find in Derbyshire. Moths of Wicken Fen NNR Wicken Fen NNR is THE classic moth site in England. It is Britain's oldest National Nature Reserve, and is a remnant of the once extensive fen system in Cambridgeshire, which was drained for agriculture in the early 20th century. Moths of Dry Sandford Pit NR, Oxfordshire Dry Sandford Pit is a BBOWT Nature Reserve near Abingdon. It's well known for a population of Scarlet Tiger moths, although I've never been lucky to see them when I've visited! It's also a guaranteed site for Privet Hawk moths though, and has a good population of Marsh Helleborines for those who like their flora. Moths from other places in England There's a good selection of species here, including one of Britain's rarest moths, from various spots I've visited in the past. Damselflies Damselflies are distinguished from true dragonflies by their slender bpdies, similar pairs of wings, and the different gill structure on their larvae. There are 17 breeding species of damselfly in Britain (although in recent years one or two new species such as the Willow Emerald Damselfly have recolonised southern England after many years' absence), in contrast to 26 breeding dragonflies. Dragonflies Dragonflies can be seen just about anywhere in Britain, even in town gardens, where some larger species may wander occasionally. Many species are relatively widespread, although some such as the White-faced Darter are habitat specialists and can only be reliably seen on particular nature reserves. Flora of Dorset Dorset is a lowland county, and its warmer, southerly climate enables some of Britain's rarer plants to survive. Each habitat has its own specialities, from heathland orchids, to chalk downland sedges, to broad-leaved woodland trees. Flora of Ben Lawers NNR, Perthshire Ben Lawers is one of the most important botanical sites in the whole of Britain. It is one of Scotland's highest mountains (1214m), and this, coupled with its calcareous rock, make it a refuge for some of Britain's rarest plants. The mountain's special alpine flora has suffered badly from overgrazing in the past, but efforts are ongoing to restore the original habitat by fencing off protected areas. Flora of Corrie Fee NNR, Scotland Corrie Fee is a National Nature Reserve in the Eastern Highlands of Scotland, between Dundee and the Cairngorm mountains. It is well-known for its rare Arctic alpine flora, but can also boast interesting animals such as Golden Eagles. Flora of Tentsmuir Point NNR, Fife Tentsmuir Point is a peninsula of land jutting out into the North Sea between Dundee and St Andrews. It is a very important site for wintering seals and migratory birds, but also has some interesting flora in its dune slacks and pine forest. Many thanks to Tom Cunningham, the ranger, for all his help over the years in allowing me to explore 'The Point'. Flora of Fiordland NP Fiordland is justifiably hailed as one of the most spectacular areas of New Zealand to explore; the scenery really is breathtaking, and for once the tourist brochures can be believed! As with other major mountainous areas of New Zealand, Fiordland has its share of unique endemics and more widespread common species. All are adapted to come with the heavy rainfall - parts of Fiordland have the highest annual rainfall anywhere in the world! These photos are from the short walk to Key Summit, starting from The Divide. A small selection are also from the beautiful walk from the Hollyford River to Lake Marion. Flora of the Catlins & Canterbury The Catlins is the area in the south-east of the South Island, roughly between Nugget Point and Invercargill. The coast is very scenic, and there are beautiful podocarp forests to explore. I've put photos from two areas in Canterbury in this section, although they're a long drive from the Catlins! Flora of Stewart Island Stewart Island is still largely wilderness, and remains one of the most unspoiled areas in New Zealand. It has escaped the clearing of native forests for agriculture, and has some superb natural podocarp forest within minutes of Oban, the only town on the island. Stewart Island has been isolated from the rest of New Zealand for at least ___________. This has led to the evolution of a small number of endemic plants. Flora of the northern South Island Photos from Nelson Lakes NP, Kahurangi NP and Abel Tasman NP. Bryophytes of New Zealand New Zealand has an internationally important bryophyte flora, with a high diversity of species, many of which are endemic. Flora of the south-western South Island Photos from Westland and Mt Aspiring National Parks. Perhaps my favourite part of the South Island! Flora of the North Island The North Island is markedly different from the south, both in topography and climate, and this affects the flora there. Alpine areas are much less extensive, and the diversity of plants there is much lower than the for the South Island mountains, although there are a few endemic species. Being more temperate, and even subtropical in the far north, the forests of the North Island contain many different plant communities. The emblematic Pohutukawa (Metrosideros tomentosa) only grows naturally in the North Island. The thermal areas of the central North Island also contain an usual assemblage of specially adapted plants. Flora of Otago Otago is significantly drier than Fiordland and Mt Aspiring to the west, and this affects the flora found there. New Zealand Mammals New Zealand is home to ___ seals, as well as Hooker's Sea-lion, one of the rarest pinnipeds in the world. New Zealand Insects New Zealand has a relatively few butterfly and dragonfly species, but makes up for this in its unique wetas and other bizarre endemic insect fauna. Butterflies of Arizona Despite being a largely arid state, Arizona can boast 334 species of butterfly - more than 5 times the number found in Britain. With its rich diversity of habitats, many species can be seen without travelling too far. Moths of Arizona coming soon Other Insects of Arizona Pictured in this section is a range of dragonflies and grasshoppers. Mammals of Arizona coming soon Birds of Arizona coming soon Miscellaneous insects This section has a hotch-potch of insect photos from all sorts of places. Hopefully I'll be getting more photos, as well as improving on some of the ones already here! Arachnids Australia has a bad reputation for nasty arachnids, and with good reason in some cases. A lot of it is exaggeration though - even the 'deadly' redback is in reality a shy, timid spider, and you have to try pretty hard to get bitten. Unlike their spider cousins, Australia has no deadly scorpion species, although they can look fairly intimidating. Reptiles of Dorset & Hampshire The heaths of eastern Dorset & western Hampshire are the only place where you can hope to see all six British reptiles in a single day. That said, some are not easily seen at all, even in the correct habitats. Moths of Derbyshire part 2 Since the original page overflowed, this second section now contains the Noctuids and various micro-moths I've seen. Moths of other parts of Dorset Dorset has a superb range of moths, and many nationally rare species can be found here. British Birds My bird photography results are sadly not the best, as I have to get by with a small (200mm) zoom lens - maybe one day I'll save up a small fortune to invest in something better! Grasshoppers & their relatives Britain has 11 species of grasshopper and 11 bush-crickets. While some are very common and widespread, others are highly localised creatures found only in specific habitats. Beetles of Britain There are almost 4000 species of beetle (Coleoptera) found in Britain. Some are tiny, whilst other are more impressive, culminating in the spectacular Stag Beetle, now sadly threatened by habitat loss and changes in woodland management. British Arachnids Britain has a diverse arachnid fauna, with nearly 650 spider species, 22 harvestmen and almost 30 pseudoscorpions. In southern England, true scorpions have become naturalised around ports, after stowing away on incoming ships. Other British wildlife A mixture of other creatures that haven't been granted the privilege of their own section yet! Flora of Derbyshire - the White Peak woodlands The White Peak section was getting much too big, so the woodland flora of the White Peak now has a section of its own! Woodlands in the White Peak are dominated by Ash on thin limestone soils. The ground flora is very rich in places, especially in the steep-sided dales where the woodland has remained undisturbed and unmodified. Flora of Hampshire Hampshire is a large county with a good diversity of habitats, so a large number of native plant species can be found. Particularly good places to look are chalk downland, the heaths of the New Forest, and the beech hanger woodlands. Flora of other areas of southern England This section is filled with photos of flora from the southern half of England that don't fit into any of the other sections! There are some classics in here though, including some of Britain's rarest orchids. Flora of Scotland Flora of Scotland, apart from areas which have their own dedicated section on the site! British Lichens I'm only a novice with these plants, but am trying to photograph an expanding range of them as time goes by. I'm very grateful to various members of the iSpot community for their help with some identifications. British Fungi I'm a total novice with fungi, and am very grateful to members of the iSpot community for helping with most of the identifications in this section of the site. Bryophytes of other areas of Scotland The photos in this ever-expanding section are from various other travels in Scotland. Keas, Kakas & Kakariki Keas are one of the iconic New Zealand birds, and their cheeky antics and sociable nature make them extremely engaging subjects to watch. Kakas are their forest cousins, with a shyer disposition but equally vocal and enchanting. Birds of the Coast New Zealand's long coastline and southerly position has endowed it with a rich selection of coastal birds, from the albatrosses which come and go in its waters to the resident breeding penguins and gulls. Other birds This section is basically the 'not keas, kakas or coastal birds' section - there are tuis, bellbirds and a few other species in here. Flora of the Pine-Oak Woodlands Various forms of pine-oak woodland covers the slopes of many of Arizona's mountain ranges. The precise range of species varies with location, elevation and aspect. In south-eastern Arizona, in a a similar way to the region's fauna, various Mexican plant species of the Sierra Madre reach their northern limit, whilst an equal number of Rocky Mountain species reach their southern limit on cool north-facing mountain slopes. Flora of Riparian Areas & Grasslands coming soon Hesperiids (Skippers) The Skippers are a diverse family of butterflies in Spain, where both the alpine and Mediterranean zones are home to various closely related species. 30 members of the family are found in Spain, including all British species except the Grizzled Skipper, Pyrgus malvae (although many of its very similar looking cousins are found in the country). Papillionids (Swallowtails & Apollos) This family of butterflies contains the largest and most dazzling European species. Five species from the family can be seen in Spain, including the two pictured here. Pieridae (Whites) Spain is home to a wide variety of Pierids, from the familiar Small and Large 'Cabbage' Whites, to highly specialised mountain species such as the Peak White and Mountain Clouded Yellow. In all, 23 species from this family are found here, including all British Pierids, which are widespread and common in Spain. Lycaenids (Blues, Hairstreaks & Coppers) The Lycaenids are a very diverse family in Europe, with many very similar, closely-related species, especially among the blues. In all, 73 Lycaenids can be seen in Spain, including 54 blues, making identification a tricky prospect! All British Lycaenids can be seen in Spain, although some are restricted to the Pyrenees. Nymphalids (Browns, Fritillaries & Ringlets) The largest family of butterflies in Spain, with nearly 100 species, several found nowhere else such as the Nevada Grayling and Zapater's and Chapman's Ringlets. Other insects of Spain coming soon Flora of the Maritime Alps - part 1 The Maritime Alps form the far south-western tip of the European Alps. They have an interesting flora, ranging from widespread alpine species to localised endemics. In this first section you'll find the saxifrages and cinquefoils, among others. Flora of the Maritime Alps - part 2 The second section of Maritime Alps flora contains the milk-vetches, violets, gentians, bellflowers, and a few others! Flora of the Maritime Alps - part 3 The final section of Maritime Alps flora contains all the composites, along with the monocotyledonous plants (orchids, lilies, sedges, woodrushes & grasses), ferns and fern relatives. Flora of the Queyras - part 1 coming soon Flora of the Queyras - part 2 coming soon Flora of the Queyras - part 3 coming soon Flora of the central Hautes-Alpes & Savoie - part 1 coming soon Flora of the central Hautes-Alpes & Savoie - part 2 coming soon Bryophytes of the Queyras & Hautes-Alpes coming soon Mosses of Derbyshire part 4 Hypnales part 2 Bryophytes of Savoie Text coming soon Bryophytes of Italy coming soon Bryophytes of the Maritime Alps coming soon Flora of Derbyshire - the White Peak grasslands - part 2 coming soon Mammals of France coming soon Flora of Cumbria & the Lake District coming soon! Arthur's Pass new coming soon Butterflies of France dh